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MMMMMMM…. YUM! Please tell me there’ s more.

Does that sound familiar? The moment you get served a delicious dish, and you’re excited but you also sort of have anxiety because you don’t want it to end? And you get all protective about your plate and don’t let anyone else get near it. It’s delicious, and its yours, period. Right?

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It’s like in life: when you live something that is blissful, great, and other—worldy, you simply don’t want it to end, and there’s a kind of sadness floating in the back of your mind because you know that at some point it will end. Trips and vacations end, relationships end, magical and special moments end, really great books end.  – everything ends. That’s simply the rhythm of life, and the nature of how things go: they come and go, go up and down, and they fill you and empty you at the same time. Opposites complement each other; one doesn’t exist without the other. 

FullSizeRender-451FullSizeRender-454When we try a delicious dish our eyes widen and we eat it with passion. We wish there’d be no end to our bowl of pasta, and unconsciously (or consciously) we simply want to ask for more. That happens especially with small portions like tacos, sushi makis, and appetizers; a feeling like they will be gone fast and you want more.  In Mexico, this often happened to me; food was so exquisite that I couldn’t stop eating, or even worse, I had this feeling that I shouldn’t stop eating because it was sooooo good! And then one ends up munching on all the nachos, tacos, chilaquiles, guac n’ chips, beans, and then:

Excuse me, is there a dessert menu?”  (spicy food also simply stimulates appetite)

FullSizeRender-453That craving of wanting more and more of the good stuff (even before we are finished with what we already have), makes me think about our innability to ENJOY and savor slowly what we already have right now; what is already in front of us. I realize how hard it is for us to relish the process , and to be open and take pleasure from the “perfect” moments in our lives. We realize something is good, and then internally our mind says MORE; I just want more of that, without truly pausing and letting it infuse us. I think we want more of the good stuff because we fear that it will finish soon. If only we would be able to fully absorb and let the boundless joy of life (and of food) fill up every pore in us, we wouldn’t feel the need for more. 

It’s almost like we think that our system isn’t prepared to receive so much pleasure, so we distract ourselves with the idea of more. We become fixated and ambitious, and don’t realize the greatness that’s in our plate, literally and metaphorically.

We spend our whole lives trying to find what we really love, and then when we have it in front of us we are like, ok next! — There’s nothing wrong with being ambitious, but there’s something wrong when it completely blinds and robs you from fully being in the pleasurable moments.

It sounds ironic but it is pretty hard to be fully open and present to the beauty that life can offer us.

Same thing happens with food: we try the first bite of some super delicious dish, and then we just start eating it really fast hoping there’ll be more later. But what happened with every bite? What happened to that moment when you were eating? What happened to relishing and getting engrossed in every single bite and bit of the process?

FullSizeRender-452We are in a hurry to have more and we don’t really fully go into the awesomeness we have now; we are in a rush to have more money, more beauty, more success, more shoes, more trips, more clothes, more love, more food, more, more, and more… (Like being on a trip, and already talking about the next trip you’ll do).

I believe this need for more (without realizing the beauty we have now) has to do with feeling that nothing is ever good enough, and perhaps even in a deeper level believing that we are not enough.

The way we eat is a reflection of how we live and how we face our lives.

Let’s not be SCARED to enjoy what we are and what we have. Let’s not be scared of opening up to the full pleasure we can get from life.

Processed with VSCOcam with g3 presetWe’ve been taught to always look for more and raise the bar higher, to look into the future and think of what we could be if only we would… STOP. It’s all here right now. Use your life, and use what you have now:  learn from the shitty stuff, and fully rejoice in the awesome stuff.

We are used to view a good thing as an opportunity to think about what could be better; to ask for more.

propuesta1The problem begins when we are not mindful of the journey. When we take the first bite and we don’t savor it, we don’t chew slowly, we don’t breathe deeply, and we don’t feel how that one bite slowly fills us up. We don’t give ourselves time to take a PAUSE and to PAY ATTENTION; we don’t bask in the moment and in the detail of things. We simply carry on and wonder: is there more?

Relish on the sunny days because you never know when the rainy ones will come.

Use the sweet moments in your life to charge your batteries so they help you overcome the not-so-sweet moments that will surely come.

I hope you can enjoy this post as much as I enjoyed Mexican flavors.

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Translation collaboration: Elizabeth Otaola

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